Posts from the “Live videos” Category

LONDON GRAMMAR x CAMILLE

Posted on 08/10/2017

If you had told me a year ago that I would get to perform with Camille and London Grammar, I would have had a hard time believing you. These are two of the most beautiful and fascinating voices ever, and some of the most exciting projects around. But the occasion did materialize when Camille invited Hannah, Dan and Dot along when we did the French TV show Alcaline last month.


Que je t’aime

Posted on 03/01/2017

Here’s a throwback to 2009 when we played the Stade de France in Paris with Johnny Hallyday. 240.000 people came out to the three sold out shows – this was in proportions way beyond anything I’d tried before, and I doubt that I’ll ever get to see these kinds of crowds again. We played in front of a million people at the Eiffel Tower on Bastille day – nobody gets to play in front of a million people! So I cherish this unique memory, as strange as it was. I didn’t grow up with these songs, so they don’t trigger the same nostalgic feeling in me as they do in people from France – much like I discovered the songs of Louise Attaque or Jean-Louis Aubert in front of huge, nostalgic crowds. It’s a true privilege to get to catch up with French popular culture this way!

Johnny is one hell of a singer, can’t argue with that, and I enjoyed playing with this great band a lot.


Keren Ann 2016

Posted on 15/03/2016

Most of the time, one of the hardest things in this job is to manage times and calendars – options moving around, cancelled gigs, postponed events, last minute proposals etc. But things have fit well together this month – the available days in the Louise Attaque schedule coincide with a few TV promotional things with Keren Ann for her cool upcoming record, “You’re Gonna Get Love”, produced by Renaud Letang. Here’s the title track from the record from last Friday’s “Ce soir ou jamais” on France 2.


The end of the Orpailleur Tour

Posted on 29/07/2014

We’ve had to cancel the last few shows of the tour with Gaetan Roussel. Gaetan broke his Achilles tendon on stage in Paris last week, and the operation and recovery unfortunately aren’t compatible with the remaining festivals. The operation went well, so everything should be fine for Gaetan in the long run, but recovery and reeducation is long and complicated for this type of injury.

What a tour this has been, it was an enormous pleasure to once again work with Gaetan, and to be part of such a talented, dedicated team of people. Hope that it won’t be too long before another album and tour! Here’s one of our last shows from La Rochelle on Bastille day, July 14th.


Fender Rhodes Piano Bass

Posted on 16/06/2014

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Obviously, the Fender Rhodes electric piano is by now a legendary instrument, among the most remarkable instruments invented in the 20th century, and used on so many landmark recordings that everybody knows the sound, even if they don’t know the name of the instrument. The piano solo on “Get Back” by the Beatles, or the raindrop-like sound on the intro of “Riders on the storm” by the Doors, just about any Stevie Wonder song from the ’70s, and so many other tracks in just about any style: Pop, Rock, Soul, Jazz, Latin etc.

An interesting historic fact about the Rhodes piano is that in 1959, when Leo Fender, the highly successful guitar builder, teamed up with Harold Rhodes, the at the time struggling inventor of the Rhodes piano, Leo Fender actually hated the now ubiquitous mid- and top-range of the instrument. He thought that only the bass register could make a marketable instrument. The Fender company released the Fender Rhodes Piano Bass that same year, and until 1965 the Piano Bass was the only Rhodes piano around. Harold Rhodes was assigned to developing other instruments, more in the line of the Hohner Clavinet, while he continued to develop a full-range Rhodes piano in his sparetime. In 1965, CBS bought the Fender company, and this paved the way for a Fender Rhodes full-range 73-note piano with built-in speaker. The rest is history. The Fender name was eventually dropped from the instrument in 1974.

It’s interesting how the in so many other ways visionary Leo Fender missed realising the full potential of the instrument. However, the Piano Bass is a fantastic instrument in its own right; and many of the features later found on the full-range Rhodes pianos were inherited from the Piano Bass – the tolex, the fiberglass top, and the basic structure of the instrument. And the Piano Bass made its own mark on music history, mainly as a fundamental part of the Doors’ innovative sound; the band had no bass player (except on a few studio recordings) – it was keyboardist Ray Manzarek’s left hand that played the band’s bass parts on the Piano Bass.

I’ve had a silvertop Piano Bass for a while now, and while I rarely get to use it (bands almost always have a bass player), it’s always a treat when I have the chance. Below is a video from Nyon in 2008 with Keren Ann. I joined on the last part of her tour, and the musicians were already starting to get other engagements. Consequently the line-up changed a lot depending on who was available on any given date.. Fortunately, this approach works really well with Keren’s repertoire, as everything is based around her songs, guitar and voice. The core material is so strong than it doesn’t really matter whether she’s playing with a full band or just a trumpet player, and the shows stay fresh that way, to say the least. On a few gigs, including the one in Nyon, we had no bass player, so I jumped on the opportunity to break out the Piano Bass.